About

OUR STORY

Spearheaded primarily through the efforts of the Focus 2000 Children, Youth and Families Initiative, the Lincoln-Central Neighborhood Family Center (LCNFC) was born out of concern that many Columbus residents’ needs were not being met. Issues typically thought of as “big city” problems – i.e. poverty, domestic violence, drug addiction, homelessness, etc. – routinely plagued far too many of Columbus’ downtown residents.

The LCNFC representing one of the largest “grassroots movements” ever to take place in Bartholomew County opened its doors in 1994 serving Columbus, Indiana’s downtown district, Census Tract 101, henceforth known as the Lincoln-Central Neighborhood. The Center’s first home, Lincoln Elementary School, helped jump-start an ambitious LCNFC programming component that included summer and after-school programming for youth and regular family activities. During this time, our neighbors voices were heard loud and clear! True neighborhood leadership was identified! This fine group of folks partnered with human service providers and community professionals to form the Neighborhood-Based Planning Team.

It was this group’s charge to determine what neighborhood residents wanted the LCNFC to become. Through a comprehensive needs assessment, neighborhood residents identified seven priority areas of concern for the Lincoln-Central Neighborhood: Health, Education, Positive Youth Development, Parent-Child Interaction, Parent Support, Safety and Infrastructure. In response to these needs, the LCNFC, through its numerous partners, built a programming model that centers around these seven priorities.

Upon completion of personal and professional trainings and the development of by-laws, policies and procedures, the Neighborhood-Based Planning Team evolved into the LCNFC Board of Directors. One critical by-law, which in many respects defines the philosophy of the LCNFC, is that a minimum of 60 percent of the Board’s composition will be held by residents of the Lincoln-Central Neighborhood. This assures that residents will always have the final say on critical decisions.

Thanks to generous contributions from The Heritage Fund – The Community Foundation of Bartholomew County, The Wylie Foundation and the City of Columbus, the LCNFC moved into our current home at 1039 Sycamore Street in the heart of the area in which we serve. The generosity of the aforementioned groups has afforded the LCNFC the luxury of dealing with residents in their own backyards. Additionally, we remain grateful to Irwin Union Bank, who provided a beautiful, rent-free facility for more than two years during our transition to Sycamore Street.

Through the years, five core components continue to be the backbone of the LCNFC’s programming philosophy – advocacy , neighborhood improvement , human services , people empowerment and collaboration. The LCNFC’s deep rooted heritage of empowerment, involving those most affected by our decisions, and our one-stop shop concept affords the LCNFC staff, Board and volunteers a visionary approach to service delivery and case management.

As the LCNFC continues to grow in its scope and magnitude, the issues facing residents in Columbus’ downtown community remain constant and, at times, overwhelming. The Board’s mission remains strong in its desire to help resolve the struggles of our neighbors. We eagerly look forward to the future, a brighter future for all of our children, youth and adults.

The LCNFC is proud to be a Certified United Way Agency.


STAFF

The LCNFC Staff is comprised of four individuals who seek to serve, organize and facilitate the work of the Lincoln-Central Neighborhood Family Center. The current staff members are listed below as well as their contact information.

RANDY ALLMAN

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

rpallman@bcremc.net


DIANE DOUP

COMMUNITY OUTREACH

dadoup@bcremc.net


DAWN BIEBERLE

BARTHOLOMEW COUNTY WORKS

bcworkscoach@gmail.com


LISA PEIN

NEIGHBORHOOD REVITALIZATION

lcnfcrevitalization@gmail.com


BOARD MEMBERS

The LCNFC Board of Directors is comprised of 19 members, including youth and adult representation. There are currently eight at-large members and 11 neighborhood resident members. One critical by-law, which in many respects defines the philosophy of the LCNFC, is that a minimum of 60 percent of the Board’s composition be held by residents of the Lincoln-Central Neighborhood. The current board members are listed below.

JACK COMBEST

BOARD MEMBER – RESIDENT


JACQUE DOUGLAS

BOARD MEMBER – AT LARGE


TRACIE GOWER

BOARD MEMBER – RESIDENT


DAN GREENE

BOARD MEMBER – AT LARGE


ROBIN HILBER

BOARD MEMBER – RESIDENT


NAN KEACH

BOARD MEMBER – AT LARGE


KAREN KOENIG

BOARD MEMBER – RESIDENT


CRAIG MONROE

BOARD MEMBER – RESIDENT


RICK ROBERTS

BOARD MEMBER – AT LARGE


TIM SHUFFETT

BOARD MEMBER – AT LARGE


MARY STROH

BOARD MEMBER – RESIDENT


JILL TASKER

BOARD MEMBER – RESIDENT


GRANT TUCKER

BOARD MEMBER – AT LARGE


SUSAN WHIPKER

BOARD MEMBER – RESIDENT


BEN HARPRING

BOARD MEMBER – RESIDENT


MARIA RODRIQUEZ

BOARD MEMBER – RESIDENT


ERIC FREY

BOARD MEMBER – AT LARGE


JAMES WERKAMP

BOARD MEMBER – RESIDENT





MEDIA

On the left, former resident Board Members, Tammy Apple and Terry Anderson discuss the impact the LCNFC has had on their neighborhood. Board President, Jacque Douglas and Executive Director Randy Allman add thoughts as well.

On the right, Community Outreach Coordinator, Diane Doup describes some of the ways the LCNFC utilizes volunteers. Hannah Shoemaker speaks passionately about her experiences volunteering!